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Feb 20, 2022 08:00am
Foretastes of Heaven
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“Yet a time is coming and has now come when the true worshipers will worship the Father in the Spirit and in truth, for they are the kind of worshipers the Father seeks”
(John 4:23).

Like most youngsters, I volunteered to lick the beaters for most of my Mom’s famous recipes. Let’s be clear . . . not kraut casserole, but anything chocolate-y! The first touch to my taste buds was anticipated delight . . . everything else could wait, even my trusted sidekick, Buddy (picture a 90-pound German “shedder” to the max)! And yes, the garden hose was the cleanup tool of choice for most of my tasting sessions! But it was so worth it!
 

Do we notice God providing the same foretastes, or do we miss them? 

The divine arrival of brilliant sunsets, encouraging texts, and bills anonymously paid just might be a God whisper. Make no mistake about it . . . God is going to blow our spiritual socks off when we, His children, arrive at heaven’s gate. Our limited minds can’t fathom the majesty anymore than a fourth grader starting for the pros. #mindblown 

Seriously, the God who easily spoke the world into existence in perfect order doesn’t require assistance in creating our breath-taking eternal home: heaven.
The preparation has been seamless, prescriptive, and awe-inspiring. 

Let’s be clear, Heaven is not a reward for doing well. Nope. No human deserves God’s favor. On our best days, we are all guilty sinners with no rightful claim to the goodness of God. Like most parables, the one found in Matthew 20:1-15, where the vineyard workers were unhappy with their wages, brings into story format how grace works when God rules. These timeless principles are not up for Internet debate or earthly posturing. 

The story unfolds with jealousy, envy, resentment, and judgment as Jesus explains that “the last shall be first, and the first, last” to the grumbling workers who feel they deserve more. (Don’t miss it. We act the same.) Oh, but the foretaste . . . What? Is the parable elevating humility? Do we? 

Oops! Wait a second . . . is this similar to the thief on the cross who entered paradise? Do we expect more for being less sinful than some people? John Macarthur perfectly illustrates, “Your place in heaven is not a timeshare where your access is determined by the length of time you spent doing the Lord’s work.” 

Thank you, heavenly Father, that quotas do not exist where we are headed! None of our “goodness” is measured for forgiveness needed, and EVERYONE receives the unmerited abundance of God. Be alert for your heavenly foretastes and live in gratitude and thankfulness until our earthly mission is complete. 

Let’s be about making heaven crowded.